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The way the interiors are designed to be so multifaceted is amazing. I really like all the varied patterns, and how on the wall they are both haphazard and yet ordered. As a writer, it really stimulates the imagination: I don't doubt my literary predecessor counterparts in the Islamic world felt similarly.

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I agree it's really stimulating! And do you know why they're so multifaceted? It's because they are showing the inside and outside of the pavilion simultaneously, including the two side walls that you're not supposed to be able to see. Naturalistic perspective is so boring isn't it? Why reduce reality to one viewpoint when you can show one moment from all around at the same time.

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Haha well I can appreciate the power of concentration in a single viewpoint, but thinking back it's true that a lot of my favorite visual artists are those who take in more: be it Cuno Amiets Snow Field, the Hlebine school paintings that encapsulate an entire village, or Alfons Muchas Slav Epic. (The list, naturally, could be a lot longer)

The different colors and patterns placed on exterior vs. interior (and then each different room) is what I like about this. Exteriors and interiors are not neutral but provide their own atmosphere. Each piece and side of the wall has its own meaning: this, I would say, is certainly better than modern architecture at the least. :-)

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