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deletedMay 27, 2023Liked by Joumana Medlej
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My pleasure!

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May 27, 2023Liked by Joumana Medlej

Thank you so much, as ever your post in both interesting and informative, and the pictures are gorgeous.

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Thank you!

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May 27, 2023Liked by Joumana Medlej

Well, that was an excellent way to start a Spring day! Thank you for this window into a little appreciated (at least in the US) yet very important region.

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My pleasure!

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Exquisite work! Thanks for the stunning images and detailed narration.

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Thank you!

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May 27, 2023Liked by Joumana Medlej

What amazing works of art. Thank you for sharing. When my parents lived in Lahore they picked up some beautifully embroidered shawls and other things, but, of course, nothing quite at this level. We do have a couple of wall hangings that are made up of squares cut from antique, deeply embroidered wedding coats. I see a lot of the same kinds of embroidery techniques, especially in the kiymeshek chain stitch, the ko’k ko’ylak, the Qaraqalpaq robe, and especially that magnificent suzani.

Thanks again. That must have been an incredible feast for the eyes and soul.

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It makes sense that the techniques would have been similar. They sound wonderful! I also have some tribal textiles and garments from my travels in Asia, and though they're not considered precious, they are traditionally handmade and priceless to me!

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May 28, 2023Liked by Joumana Medlej

Superb - many thanks for sharing

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You're very welcome!

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Didn't make it to the Institut du Monde Arabe, but this article reminded me of the many exhibits I saw while living in Paris. I hope the Uzbeks know how precious their heritage is: I like to think we all know, but the world doesn't work that way sometimes. The colors are outstanding! Goes to show that one doesn't need our synthetic colors of today to make vivid clothing.

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Happily, they do, as we can see from the care with which these pieces are kept, and the way the Timurid monuments in these cities were restored to a mint state after the soviet nightmare had passed. As for the colours, I think a lot of these are synthetic, being mostly from the 19th century. There was sadly little information about the dyes used. You definitely can achieve brilliant colours with natural dyes, but after almost two centuries I'd expect to see at least a little mellowing, as visible in some of the suzanis and in the qaraqalpaq garments.

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